Standards of Performance & Organizational Values

I recently finished reading the seminal leadership book, The Score Takes Care of Itself, by Bill Walsh, the legendary 49ers Head Coach. In 1979 when Walsh took over the 49ers, the franchise was the laughing stock of the NFL as it managed to win only two games that season. However, in less than two years, Walsh led the 49ers from last place to Super Bowl Champs. A true Cinderella story. When Walsh left the franchise ten years later, the team had won three Super Bowl Championships and completed perhaps the greatest run in NFL history. 

How did Walsh fuel this transformation and build one of the great NFL dynasties? He credited his “Standards of Performance” as the catalyst for driving organizational change and maintaining a high level of performance during his tenure with the team. Walsh codified his “Standards of Performance” and drove them throughout every level of the organization including the administrative staff.  Within the first year, there was a dramatic shift in the way that everyone approached and performed their jobs.  Nothing short of excellence and a team first attitude would be tolerated.  

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What Jeff Bezos Thinks Is Cool

I just finished reading the book, The Everything Store, which chronicles the life of Jeff Bezos and the rise of Amazon.  Towards the end of the book, the author, Brad Stone, tells a story about Bezos’s quest to understand how Amazon could be admired and not hated as the company raced past $100 billion in annual sales.

As part of this process, Bezos delivered a memo, titled Amazon.love, to his leadership team at a retreat. In essence, this memo outlines how he wants Amazon to conduct itself and be perceived by the world.  Bezos wrote, “Some big companies develop ardent fan bases, are widely loved by their customers, and even perceived as cool. For different reasons, in different ways and to different degrees, companies like Apple, Nike, Disney, Google, Whole Foods, Costco and even UPS strike me as examples of large companies that are well liked by their customers." 

Bezos then went on to make a list of why some companies are admired and others are loathed: 

  • Rudeness is not cool.

  • Defeating tiny guys is not cool.

  • Close-following is not cool.

  • Young is cool.

  • Risk taking is cool.

  • Winning is cool.

  • Polite is cool.

  • Defeating bigger, unsympathetic guys is cool.

  • Inventing is cool.

  • Explorers are cool.

  • Conquerors are not cool.

  • Obsessing over competitors is not cool.

  • Empowering others is cool.

  • Capturing all the value only for the company is not cool.

  • Leadership is cool.

  • Conviction is cool.

  • Straightforwardness is cool.

  • Pandering to the crowd is not cool.

  • Hypocrisy is not cool.

  • Authenticity is cool.

  • Thinking big is cool.

  • The unexpected is cool.

  • Missionaries are cool.

  • Mercenaries are not cool.

Jeff’s "cool” list struck a nerve because I’ve recently been spending a lot of time thinking about branding in the context of both RRE and the companies I’m fortunate enough to work with. Building an enduring and admired company regardless of stage and sector requires not only innovation but also strong values and morals to guide the way. 

What Startups Can Learn from Bill Belichick

“There is an old saying about the strength of the wolf is the pack, and I think there is a lot of truth to that. On a football team, it’s not the strength of the individual players, but it’s the strength of the unit and how they all function together.“ 

-Bill Belichick

This Sunday The New England Patriots are playing in their 8th Conference Championship in the Bill Belichick era. During this fourteen year span, The Patriots and their legendary head coach have not had a losing season and won an NFL-best 163 regular season games, 3 Super Bowls, 5 AFC Conference Championships, 11 AFC East Division Championships.  These numbers are especially impressive since the NFL is designed for parity in the salary-cap era.    

I’m sure you’re asking yourself, how are The Patriots able to maintain excellence over a long period of time while other teams slide up and down the standings?  The answer lies in how Bill Belichick recruits, motivates, and compensates his coaches and players.  And I strongly believe that startup founders can take away some important lessons by studying how The Patriots handle HR and personnel decisions.

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