The Era of Decentralized Computing

Over the last three months, my partner Adam Ludwin and I have been spending a good chunk of our time researching and thinking about decentralized technologies and networks.  I’ve just started my quest to understand exactly what’s going on but believe ‘decentralization’ will emerge as a mega trend in the next two to three years.  We’re not only seeing decentralized innovation around the block chain and mesh networks like OpenGarden (global) and NYCmeshnet (local) but also around storage and content delivery. My Spidey Senses tell me implications of this trend will fundamentally transform the way in which we all connect to the internet and exchange value.  It’s pretty hard not to get excited about this shift. 

RRE is actively making bets in these types of emerging technologies so I’m trying to learn as much as I can by devouring blogs, talking to founders and listening to podcasts every night.  In my quest to learn the basics, I recently stumbled upon a great podcast titled Let’s Talk Bitcoin and was pleasantly surprised when I discovered the latest installment features David Irvine, Founder / CEO of MaidSafe, one of the leading proponents for decentralized computing. In his talk David explains why decentralized architectures are good for the internet, the story behind MadeSafe and his philosophy on building a platform that creates rather than extracts value.  

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Breather - Peace & Quiet on Demand

On Friday, all of my meetings were downtown but I had a two hour open window in the late morning.  Instead of schlepping to RRE’s office in Midtown East or sitting in a noisy Starbucks with spotty wifi, I decided to give Breather a try.  Breather is a newly launched mobile app that provides on-demand rooms in large urban areas. It is the brain child of Julien Smith a Montreal-based writer and entrepreneur.  The service currently operates in Montreal and NYC, costs $25 / per hour and is available seven days a week from 6am to 10pm. 

The main goal of the app is to provide a quiet place to hold a meeting, work in private or just take a break for an hour or two. While the service is perceived as “odd,” novel and unproven, I can imagine a growing market for this type of flexible space. Demand will likely come from small companies with virtual organizations, freelancers, visiting executives and employees and even tourists. The timing for something like Breather to emerge couldn’t be any better since asset sharing, co-working and freelancing have become important pieces of the innovation economy for nearly a decade. 

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