John Wooden on Success

John Wooden is arguably the greatest men’s basketball coach of all time. He led UCLA to ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year span. Within this period, his teams won a NCAA men's basketball record 88 consecutive games.

Over the weekend, I was browsing YouTube and discovered his TED Talk from 2001. I watched the video twice because Coach Wooden’s views on success, leadership and winning are refreshing and inspiring, especially in an age where winning at all costs seems to be all that matters.

In this talk, he shares his own definition of success: “Peace of mind attained only through self satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do the best of which you’re capable.” I encourage you to read that one more time. Let his words sink in.

Wooden’s definition of success isn’t about winning, losing, getting to the top of the mountain or having the most money. It’s all about finding inner peace and satisfaction knowing that you did the best you possibly could. I love that.

When he was growing up in Indiana on a farm with no electricity, his father use to say to him don’t whine, don’t complain, don’t make excuses…just get out there and do the best of your ability. There was no mention of winning. Coincidentally, my parents instilled a similar philosophy in my siblings and me when we were in high school.

I believe leaders from all types of organizations can learn from Coach Wooden’s perspective on success. At the end of the day, winning isn’t only what truly matters. Just as important is knowing that everyone on the team is working hard together, growing individually and putting in right effort to achieve a common goal.

Adyashanti On Letting Go Of Fear

Last month, my friend Hursh introduced me to Adyashanti, the philosopher and spiritual teacher. I’ve been on break this week so decided to go down a rabbit hole and watch a number of his talks on YouTube.

This one on fear particularly resonated with me. Instead of fighting our fears, Adyashanti suggests slowing down, getting still, and relaxing into the knowledge that you will let go when the time is right and you are ready. He makes a compelling argument that there’s nothing to fear to begin with but we need to discover that ourselves by meeting that fear.

If you’re currently battling fear in your life, I invite and encourage you to take fifteen minutes to watch this short talk. It helped me shift my perspective and let go of a fear I’ve been holding onto for months. May it do the same for you.

Life is Interrelated

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“It really boils down to this: that all life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. We are made to live together because of the interrelated structure of reality. Did you ever stop to think that you can’t leave for your job in the morning without being dependent on most of the world? You get up in the morning and go to the bathroom and reach over for the sponge, and that’s handed to you by a Pacific islander. You reach for a bar of soap, and that’s given to you at the hands of a Frenchman. And then you go into the kitchen to drink your coffee for the morning, and that’s poured into your cup by a South American. And maybe you want tea: that’s poured into your cup by a Chinese. Or maybe you’re desirous of having cocoa for breakfast, and that’s poured into your cup by a West African. And then you reach over for your toast, and that’s given to you at the hands of an English-speaking farmer, not to mention the baker. And before you finish eating breakfast in the morning, you’ve depended on more than half the world. This is the way our universe is structured, this is its interrelated quality. We aren’t going to have peace on Earth until we recognize this basic fact of the interrelated structure of all reality.”

-Martin Luther King Jr. in a 1967 speech