Shuddle: Scheduled Rides for Busy Families

When I was a kid my mom always used to complain how she had to schlep us around town. Often times she had to be in three places at once and finding alternative transportation wasn’t easy.  Not much has changed twenty years later. Talk with any parent today. Many will admit that safe and reliable transportation is one of their biggest challenges. The reality is households are busier than ever and the stay-at-home mom is a relic of the past.  

Last October I stumbled across an article in Recode that featured a new startup called Shuddle. The piece described Shuddle as “Uber for kids.” It occurred to me that Shuddle was trying to solve the transportation problem that has haunted families for decades. Several hours later, the article was emailed around the firm because the idea of providing safe and reliable transportation for kids resonated with the group. Everyone agreed that we had to meet this company.    

The following month, Rebecca Kaden of Maveron introduced me to Nick Allen, Shuddle’s Founder and CEO. Prior to starting the company, Nick co-founded Sidecar, a popular ride sharing application. At Sidecar, he observed many families were using Sidecar to transport their kids. Upon further research, he discovered that traditional ride sharing companies aren’t built to handle that customer segment.  They typically don’t have the right insurance and it’s against their terms of service since passengers must be at least 18 years old. In discussions with many parents, he discovered they don’t trust the existing brands since safety isn’t built into their products. While Nick isn’t a parent, it was clear to me after the first meeting that he was going to build the safest and most reliable transportation product in the world. 

Read More

New Investment: Breather

Two years ago I was introduced to Julien Smith, Founder / CEO of Montreal and NYC-based Breather, by my good friend Taylor Davidson. Taylor explained that Breather was building a new type of private cafe that could be accessed via mobile app. I thought the concept sounded crazy and unique at the same time so I agreed to take a meeting with Julien. When I first met Julien and he explained the concept to me, I believed he was absolutely nuts. For those of you who haven’t heard of Breather, it’s a network of private spaces you can access by the hour through an iPhone and Android app. Think of Breather as productive and private space on demand. 

Breather quietly launched in NYC earlier this year and Julien encouraged me to give it a shot. I believe I was one of their first customers. In fact, I was so pleasantly surprised by the experience I decided to write a detailed post about what it’s like to work in a Breather space. I had never experienced anything quite like it. The company created a “full stack” experience that felt like magic. Pull out my phone. Activate the Breather app. Pick a location. Reserve a time slot. Invite colleagues. Turn by turn directions to the space. Arrive at the door. Access the space via the Breather app. And presto! I now have private space all to myself. Here’s where Breather is different: they own the end-to-end experience from the app all the way down to the look and feel of the spaces. The experience is carefully crafted and consistent throughout the network. You can tell the team deeply cares about the user experience. A well-known investor used the service after I encouraged him to give it a try. He texted me immediately afterwards and simply wrote, “It was flawless.”  

Read More

Tinybop: Educating Kids In Every Country

Several years ago when I was at Lerer Ventures, Sam Gerstenzang, our summer intern, recommended  that I meet with Raul Gutierrez, Founder CEO of a Brooklyn-based creative studio called Tinybop.  When Sam explained that Tinybop was building educational apps for kids, I was immediately skeptical because I’ve seen hundreds of companies in the space and my identical twin brother founded a children’s media studio, CloudKid.  After some back and forth with Sam, I begrudgingly agreed to meet with Raul but promised that I would keep an open mind. Over the course of the next two years, Raul and I spent countless hours talking about the future of children’s media and his vision for building the next great education brand.  To Raul’s credit, he was able to transform me from a skeptic to a believer.  Despite the space being hyper competitive with thousands of app publishers, I truly believe that Tinybop is the one percent of the one percent.  That’s why I’m incredibly excited and proud to announce that RRE has led Tinybop’s Series A Financing with participation from TwoSigma, KEC, Brooklyn Bridge Ventures and Kapor Capital.  

Read More

On Demand Everything

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the “Uberfication” of the U.S. service economy. Given the positive response from founders, investors and the broader tech community, my partners at RRE invited me to speak about this investment theme at our annual meeting this afternoon.  As part of my talk, I prepared a high level presentation which summarizes the opportunity (see embed below).  As always, would love to hear your questions, comments and / or feedback.  We’re always looking to get smarter about how mobile is simplifying our lives and reshaping our economy.     

https://www.slideshare.net/schlaf/on-demand-everything

Uberification of the US Service Economy

Since I joined RRE Ventures last fall, I’ve spent time researching mobile on-demand services that we are able to access with a push of a button. “On-demand mobile services” (ODMS) is a broad category so I believe it’s important to start with a definition.  My friend Semil Shah defines ODMS as “apps which aggregate consumer demand on mobile devices, but fulfill that demand through offline services.”  I’ll take it one step further:  ODMS deliver a “closed loop” experience by collapsing the value chain including discovery, order, payment, fulfillment (offline but within owned network) and confirmation. In the pre-mobile era we had to search yellow pages (or google), find a provider, call  or email that provider, wait to connect with someone, schedule a convenient time, hope the provider arrives on time, and then pay with a credit card or cash.  Thankfully, a new array of mobile services removes all of that friction we were used to experiencing. Welcome to the uberification of our service economy.

Read More

Breather - Peace & Quiet on Demand

On Friday, all of my meetings were downtown but I had a two hour open window in the late morning.  Instead of schlepping to RRE’s office in Midtown East or sitting in a noisy Starbucks with spotty wifi, I decided to give Breather a try.  Breather is a newly launched mobile app that provides on-demand rooms in large urban areas. It is the brain child of Julien Smith a Montreal-based writer and entrepreneur.  The service currently operates in Montreal and NYC, costs $25 / per hour and is available seven days a week from 6am to 10pm. 

The main goal of the app is to provide a quiet place to hold a meeting, work in private or just take a break for an hour or two. While the service is perceived as “odd,” novel and unproven, I can imagine a growing market for this type of flexible space. Demand will likely come from small companies with virtual organizations, freelancers, visiting executives and employees and even tourists. The timing for something like Breather to emerge couldn’t be any better since asset sharing, co-working and freelancing have become important pieces of the innovation economy for nearly a decade. 

Read More