Startup Pitch Decks

A few weeks ago, Alex Iskold of TechStars NYC asked me to talk with the Winter 2017 class about constructing an effective fundraising pitch deck. I jumped at the chance because this is an important topic that often comes up with first time and even repeat entrepreneurs when they’re about to embark on a fundraising process. In my short career as a VC, I’ve reviewed thousands of pitch decks and helped hundreds of founders refine their pitches. Additionally, I’m often approached by founder friends to provide feedback on their slides before they go to market. Given pitch decks are frequently discussed and they’re essential in the fundraising process, I thought it would be useful to create a simple guide to building an effective pitch deck.

Our goal with ‘Startup Pitch Decks’ is simple: to provide founders with a simple framework and reference guide that can be utilized before kicking off a fundraising process or when you’re in the throes of drafting your pitch deck. We dive into a number of topics including the ideal format, a sample build process, tips and tricks, advice from RRE founders, and even things to avoid. We’ve tried to make the guide as comprehensive as possible but realize it’s impossible to include every piece of advice and address every question. As such, we’d love to hear your questions, suggestions and feedback. Our aim is to evolve ‘Startup Pitch Decks’ with your help and input so it gets more useful over time.

All that said, it’s my pleasure to present Startup Pitch Decks. Hope you find it useful, thought provoking and perhaps even inspiring.

(Finally, I’d like to thank my colleagues at RRE — Jason Black, Alice Lloyd George and Cooper Zelnick — for providing feedback and adding some polish to the final product)

Why I Invest

Last Friday night after a long week, I decided to go for a long run and listen to a Buddhist lecture on the true nature of existence and the self. About ten minutes into the run, I started to contemplate why I have chosen various paths in life such as becoming a venture investor. Since I have decided to make this my life’s work, I began to examine what really drove this long-term decision and whether I was being honest with myself. As soon as I returned home and showered, I opened up my computer and published the following tweet.

Ryan Hoover of Product Hunt was the first to reply and suggested that I expand on the tweet and provide commentary and context on each one. I hadn’t considered writing a post, but ultimately decided it would be enlightening and cathartic to dive into each reason and expose myself.

Below is an expanded view into all the reasons that I have chosen VC as a career. I’ve also tried to be honest about what drives me. While this list captures how I feel today, I’m sure it will evolve over time as I learn more about myself and my worldview changes.

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New Investment: Breather

Two years ago I was introduced to Julien Smith, Founder / CEO of Montreal and NYC-based Breather, by my good friend Taylor Davidson. Taylor explained that Breather was building a new type of private cafe that could be accessed via mobile app. I thought the concept sounded crazy and unique at the same time so I agreed to take a meeting with Julien. When I first met Julien and he explained the concept to me, I believed he was absolutely nuts. For those of you who haven’t heard of Breather, it’s a network of private spaces you can access by the hour through an iPhone and Android app. Think of Breather as productive and private space on demand. 

Breather quietly launched in NYC earlier this year and Julien encouraged me to give it a shot. I believe I was one of their first customers. In fact, I was so pleasantly surprised by the experience I decided to write a detailed post about what it’s like to work in a Breather space. I had never experienced anything quite like it. The company created a “full stack” experience that felt like magic. Pull out my phone. Activate the Breather app. Pick a location. Reserve a time slot. Invite colleagues. Turn by turn directions to the space. Arrive at the door. Access the space via the Breather app. And presto! I now have private space all to myself. Here’s where Breather is different: they own the end-to-end experience from the app all the way down to the look and feel of the spaces. The experience is carefully crafted and consistent throughout the network. You can tell the team deeply cares about the user experience. A well-known investor used the service after I encouraged him to give it a try. He texted me immediately afterwards and simply wrote, “It was flawless.”  

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Why Saying No Is Hard

Being an investor isn’t easy for a number of reasons. But the hardest part for me is saying “No.” I meet hundreds of entrepreneurs each year, and at RRE Ventures we invest in only a small percentage of them. VC’s generally invest in less than 1% of companies they meet. So if you do the math, you know I have to say “No” a lot.

There are countless reasons why we choose not to back an early stage venture. Market size. Wrong team. Bad timing. Competition. Traction. Lack of monetization. Little or no competitive advantage. Outside our expertise. Valuation. I could go on. 

But regardless of whether I exchange a quick email with a founder or spend hours getting to know him or her, passing is the worst. It’s the only part of my job that I truly hate. And it’s not just because I lose the option to invest down the road. I hate passing because my daily work with entrepreneurs has given me a good look into their struggles…what founders sacrifice daily to ensure that their company is in a better place tomorrow than it is today. It becomes personal, emotional…it's only human to feel for the founders who…

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